Why working with your hands is coming back into “style”

We’ve all heard the old clichés about proud parents wanting their children to become Doctors, Lawyers, and Architects. “Stay in school,” they’ll say. “Get a nice clean job,” they’ll say. “Make us proud, and become a big important Engineer” is what many of us heard growing up. Anything else was second best. The “other” types of jobs were reserved for people who couldn’t make it, and couldn’t hack the demands of a PhD or the Bar Exam, or the pressures of becoming a Heart Surgeon. No one’s really sure where these stereotypes come from, or when they started, but the truth is:
* These professions don’t have any more job security than trades
* These positions don’t necessarily pay more than “other” jobs
* The prestige associated with those fields are largely imagined
* The people who perform in those roles are no happier than everyone else

The misconception about becoming an Auto Mechanic (just like a Welder or Construction Worker) is that it is not a “clean” job, you don’t use your mind much, and anyone can do it. After all, you don’t wear a suit to work every morning, you don’t have a fancy business card, and you certainly don’t have your own executive office on the 50th floor. Similar beliefs are held about Hairdressers and Estheticians: why would anyone choose to work with their hands and “serve” others in a thankless position? Wouldn’t you rather become a Head Nurse or School Principal?

Thankfully, perceptions are changing in the 21st century, and prejudicial barriers are slowly breaking down. People are being judged less and less by their gender, job title, and diplomas, and more by what they contribute to society. As mass commercialization of services like Auto Maintenance/Repair and beauty salon drove customers into nationwide chain-stores and giant franchises, these occupations ended up losing their human touch and became cold and impersonal. Individual care and familiarity was lost, and the public started turning back to their local neighbourhood Mechanic and Beautician. This resulted in a back-to-basics grassroots movement which has restored the Professional’s passion for their business, and their Clients’ appreciation for personalized care.

In an era where most people can’t fend for themselves and rely on an expert for everything, getting your hands “dirty” in the workplace has gone back from being a lowly necessity to a badge of honour. Returning back to the skills and artistry of one’s craft (especially those rooted in tradition) is a noble aim. People are also willing to pay a premium for an experienced Professional.

* Who is most important to a single mother stuck by the side of the road with a stalled minivan?
* Who ensures that the millions of motorists in North America get around safely every day?
* Who is depended upon the heaviest when a Bride is preparing for her wedding day?
* Who will help make that young man strut into his High School Prom proudly, feeling like a stud?

The role of Auto Mechanics, Hairdressers, Estheticians, Electrologists and related occupations are extremely important in our daily lives, and quietly contribute a lot to the standard of living most people enjoy. You can also make a darn comfortable living if you learn to market yourself properly and leverage referrals.

For these reasons –and many others– working with your hands is coming back into “style”. Renowned career trade schools such as Laurier Macdonald will prepare you for a career that is not only noble but also successful.